A Singular Perspective

A Blog by Nickel & Nickel Winery

cheese2

Thanks to all who attended our Nickel & Nickel Winter Open House last weekend! The fantastic crowd definitely kept things lively under overcast skies. The Napa Valley was drenched this past week with much needed rain, but the water-laden clouds spared us for the day and we entertained a full house. While Nickel & Nickel staff graciously poured our single-vineyard wines in our Fermentation Barns, Chef Trevor Eliason replenished the tables in the lounge area with cheese and charcuterie to keep palates interesting.

Cheese

Chef Trevor has provided us with suggestions for compiling your own spreads for a lovely cheese, charcuterie and wine experience at home. Keep in mind – everyone’s tastes are different, and the fun is in discovering how the food interacts with the wine on your palate.

Cheese

Age Matters: Go for aged cheeses with wonderfully concentrated flavors. At Open House, we served the Beemster Gouda, aged 18 months and 24 months.

Waxed vs. Washed: We typically recommend a waxed-rind cheese for wine pairing purposes – washed-rind cheese tends to be too ripe.

Salt Content: Look for something not too salty, so as to not interfere with the flavors of the wine. A good, balanced cheese we like to serve at events is Highway-1.

Cow, Sheep, Goat?: Local cow and sheep cheese is safe bet when attempting to pair with wine; goat cheese is not always wine-friendly. However, there are exceptions to the rule – we do offer Cypress Grove Midnight Moon Chèvre with Nickel & Nickel wines.

Charcuterie

Texture: We select thinly sliced meats instead of sausages, terrines and rillettes – think Proscuitto or Bresaola. This form of charcuterie offers a nice melt-in-your-mouth texture that is fantastic with wine.

Salty or Spicy?: Salty, fatty charcuterie goes great with our Nickel & Nickel Cabernets. Hot and spicy meats are not the best complement to our wines, but if you’re looking for something with a little bite, try a Mortadella with peppercorns.

Befriend the Butcher: It’s always great to support your local businesses. If you’re looking for charcuterie, chat with your butcher and ask if you can taste a selection of meats before you purchase. Try a combination of three different meats, like beef, pork and duck, and see what jumps out at you.

Happy pairing!